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College of Science and Mathematics

Enhancing lives through learning, discovery and innovation

Cal Poly Receives Almost $1M to Support STEM Educators

NSF scholarships will put expert science and math teachers in high-need schools

Cal Poly is one of six California State Universities (CSUs) to earn funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support educational opportunities for science and mathematics majors pursuing a K-12 teaching credential. 
 
Combined, the six CSUs will receive $7.1 million in funding from NSF’s Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, which supports the development of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) teachers.  

Stamatis Vokos

OUR FELLOWS CONTRIBUTE TO CUTTING EDGE RESEARCH... THEREBY, GIVING STUDENTS OWNERSHIP OVER THEIR LEARNING.

The 2017-18 awards fund campus projects that will lead to a more robust and diverse talent pipeline of K-12 science and math teachers — with a focus on recruiting candidates from underrepresented communities.
 
The projects will also help address the state’s shortage of credentialed STEM teachers. California continues to face a critical shortage of qualified math and science teachers with a projected need of upwards of 33,000 additional teachers in the next 10 years.


“Our fellows contribute to cutting edge research, as they also learn in concurrent workshop settings how to infuse authentic research and project-based practices in the precollege classroom, thereby giving students ownership over their learning,” said Stamatis Vokos, physics professor and STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Program director for the CSU. 


Through this NSF support, STAR will choose 32 prospective STEM teachers from across the CSU each year to be Noyce Scholars. These scholars will join immersive, mentored summer research experiences at national laboratories, universities, and research and development centers in summer 2018 and 2019. 


“The Noyce grants support the CSU’s leadership as the nation’s largest preparer of educators and of future STEM teachers,” said Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, CSU’s assistant vice chancellor of educator preparation and public school programs. “The funding also strengthens the CSU’s commitment to help address California’s teacher shortage and supports a critical state and national priority to develop a diverse science and technology workforce.”
 
Most of the awards will fund scholarships and stipends for undergraduate and teacher credential students. Each recipient can receive up to three years of scholarships with stipends of up to $10,000 per year during upper-division and credential study.
 
Each must also fulfill a teaching obligation in a high-need school district. Scholarship and stipend recipients are required to complete two years of teaching for each year of support.
 
Since the Noyce program was created in 2002, the CSU has received more than 50 awards at 22 campuses — totaling more than $45 million.
 

The CSU’s 2017-18 Noyce awards include:
Chico: $701,438 
Northern California Math and Science Teachers
San Diego: $623,763 
Upgrading the Path to Mathematics Teaching by Adding Express and Multiple On-Ramps
San Francisco: $3,299,995 
Western Regional Noyce Alliance
San Luis Obispo: $865,540 
Growing into Teacher-Researchers: Using Mindsets to Frame Research for Noyce Scholars and PIs as a Component of Teacher Preparation
San Marcos: $842,267 
Cultivating STEM Teaching Identity in Noyce Teacher Scholars
Stanislaus: $745,997 
Science Math Access, Research, and Teaching

 
The CSU is a leader in the state and nation in the quality of its teacher education programs. As the largest producer of teachers in the state and among the largest in the nation, the CSU produces more than 6,800 teaching graduates every year and more than 1,500 are STEM teachers.

 

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