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College of Science and Mathematics

Enhancing lives through learning, discovery and innovation

Website Update

Intersections Magazine - The International Edition - 2018-19

Intersections College of Science and Mathematics Fall 2016

FROM THE DEAN

Dean Dean Wendt

Students in the College of Science and Mathematics aren’t simply citizens of this country; they’re citizens of the world.

When they assist with the upgrade of the world’s largest particle accelerator in Switzerland or help children in Mexico learn to walk, they’re building a valuable skill set that will be crucial to their future success.

Spending time in another culture stretches students to see the world through a new lens and puts them in the sometimes difficult position of being the one who is different. Considering life from another perspective builds empathy, a crucial skill in our increasingly multicultural world and businesses.

After time abroad, students return to Cal Poly with interpersonal skills that help them build an inclusive community here on campus and in their neighborhoods and companies after graduation. 

We are working to increase the number of study abroad opportunities that provide Learn by Doing experiences and align with Cal Poly’s science and mathematics curriculum. Within the college, student participation in study abroad increased nearly 30 percent between 2016-17 and 2017-18.

Some of our students don’t have the financial resources needed to study or travel abroad. We’re committed to raising funds so that all interested science and mathematics students have that opportunity, regardless of their family’s income.

Science and mathematics are international in nature. Many of our faculty are involved in collaborations with mathematicians and scientists from around the world.

They’re teaching physics to monks and nuns in Bhutan or traveling the world in search of evolving plants, and they’re bringing everything they learn back to the classroom right here in San Luis Obispo.

I know our alumni are also making a difference beyond our borders. We’d love to hear the stories of how you’re using your expertise to make a positive impact on our state, nation and world.

Please tag us in your social posts when you're abroad. Sharing these examples with our current students helps them envision their future lives as global citizens.

 

DEAN WENDT, DEAN

College of Science & Mathematics

In Antarctica


GROWING UP ON THE ICE
At the bottom of the world, seal pups present a physiological mystery.

TEACHER, RESEARCHER, EXPLORER
Teacher-researcher and biology alumna Lesley Anderson brings the South Pole to her students.

In the Americas


OVERCOMING BARRIERS
Kinesiology alumna Stephanie Gomez-Rubalcava finds her calling in Mexico.

WONDERING AT THE WORLD
Encountering a different culture in Peru changes one student's perspective.

In Europe 


A PARTICLE OF HISTORY
Students help upgrade the world's largest particle accelerator.

ALSO IN EUROPE
Black holes, synthetic biology and storytelling are just a few of the topics faculty and staff address in Europe.

In Africa


DOING GOOD WITH DATA
Statistics students take on malnutrition in Malawi.

ALSO IN AFRICA
From the power of the sun to the power of soil, faculty and students make a contribution in Africa.

In Australia


CAME FOR THE WAVES, STAYED FOR THE ANIMALS
Biology alumna Pamela Anderson cares for animals and people near Sydney and throughout Australia.

ALSO IN AUSTRALIA
Collaborations down under focus on coatings and nanoelectronic networks.

In Asia


SOIL AMBASSADOR TO THE WORLD
California's state rock takes a native Sri Lankan around the world.

BUDDHA TO BERNOULLI
Physics Professor Stamatis Vokos teaches physics to monks and nuns.

ALSO IN ASIA
Statisticians show that numbers are a universal language.

Global 


Cal Poly Around the World

 

Download the magazine PDF.

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